Little Black Lies – The Webseries

How can an undead villain search for love in the age of tinder? What if you were socially awkward and a monster? Join one sexy vampire, OK maybe not that sexy, as he tries to find the love of his life, again. This anachronistic horror comedy takes its cues from the eighties feel of recent work like ‘It follows’ and ‘San Junipero’, and springs from the lively Irish comedy scene. The writer and director preciously collaborated on absurd comic shorts like ‘Lads’ and ‘Spaghetti D*ck’, and the series co-stars rising Irish talent like Nicole O’Connor (‘FACTS’), Joe O’Neill (Little Shadow Theatre Company), as well as legendary Irish actor Roger Gregg (‘About Adam’, ‘Space Truckers’).

Little Black Lies Credits

James O’Connor as ‘The Vampire’
Emily Perot as ‘Elvira’
Mike Kunze and Niamh Denyer as ‘Fighting Couple’
Joe O’Neil as ‘Krugel’
Roger Gregg as ‘King of the Vampires’
Dannii Byrne as ‘Dee’
Nicole O’Connor as ‘Fiona’
Derek as himself

Written and directed by Gareth Stack
with additional material by James Van De Waal

Director of Photography, Orla McNelis
Sound, James Van De Waal and Patrick O’Brien
Assistant Director, Special Effects and Makeup, Frances Galligan
Editer, Spider Baby

Music – Josh Lis & Seb Dooris
Theme – Patrick Carolan

Extras

Emer Hedderman
Niamh Donnelly
Patrick Carolan
Eimear ‘Ninja’ Clarkin
Oisin Gartlan
Gemma Glynn
James Van De Waal
Conor Duffy
Kejt Stachura
Patrick O’Brien
Kim Manning
Amy O’Connell
Sebastian Dooris
Conn Cowman
Glenn Kaufmann
Dorota Skiba
Nathan Butterly

Special Thanks to

A4 Sounds
12 Henrietta St
Oisin Gartlan
Romayo’s Diner
The Glimmerman
The Wonderful Barn

Sound Effects

http://freesound.org/people/SteveMannella/sounds/86167/
http://freesound.org/people/reznik_Krkovicka/sounds/240895/
http://freesound.org/people/thegoose09/sounds/125393/
http://freesound.org/people/spoonbender/sounds/244942/
http://freesound.org/people/newagesoup/sounds/339361/
http://freesound.org/people/juskiddink/sounds/66346/
http://freesound.org/people/Zabuhailo/sounds/148140/
http://freesound.org/people/mefrancis13/sounds/117608/
http://freesound.org/people/badvibezproductionz/sounds/178370/
http://freesound.org/people/limetoe/sounds/257757/
http://freesound.org/people/CadereSounds/sounds/222527/
http://freesound.org/people/Erdie/sounds/65734/
http://freesound.org/people/LeMudCrab/sounds/163453/
http://freesound.org/people/urupin/sounds/178813/
http://freesound.org/people/JakLocke/sounds/261295/
http://freesound.org/people/digifishmusic/sounds/76058/
http://freesound.org/people/digifishmusic/sounds/76064/
http://freesound.org/people/jobro/sounds/46220/
http://freesound.org/people/potentjello/sounds/194081/
http://freesound.org/people/Kodack/sounds/256310/
http://freesound.org/people/JoelAudio/sounds/135463/
http://freesound.org/people/dauser/sounds/254975/
http://freesound.org/people/newagesoup/sounds/335956/
http://freesound.org/people/bareform/sounds/237558/

Aping Tiffin

Credits

Cast – James O’Connor, Pamela Flanagan, Gavan O’Connor Duffy, Niall Bruton, Alicky Hess

Director – Gareth Stack
Script – Gareth Stack, James Van De Waal, and James O’Connor
Rehearsal Director – James O’Connor
Music – Josh Lis
Vision mixer – Sean Drew
Producer – Kara Kelly
Graphics – Keith McEvoy
Ingest – Amy O’Brien
Autocue – Sinead O Hanlon
PA – Angela English
Vision engineer – Claire Prenty
Sound 1 desk – Andrea Farrell
Sound 2 floor – Brian O Neill
Camera 1 – Darren Moynagh
Camera 2 – Orla Carney
Camera 3 – Aisling Leonard
Camera 4 – Lauren Rol
Camera 5 – Stephen Daly
Lighting – Simon Jeffers
Runner/Hospitality – John Kelly
Floor manager – Brian Hyland
Makeup – Alyx Gonzalez

Canaliculus Purgamentorum – Culture File

The tradition of artists creating provocative performance dinners, extends back at least to Filippo Marinetti’s Futurist Cookbook. The Futurists delighted in inedible meals, celebrating their love of speed, violence, and technology. The Domestic Godless, with their wilfully obscure ingredients, their exploration of culinary alternative histories, and their satirical recipes provide a more palatable, if no less creative dining experience. For my latest report for Culture File I visited Broadstone Studios, where delectable monstrosities were being served. What happens when you cross ice-cream with the contents of an Edwardian vanity cabinet? What did the stuffing from the seats of a 1974 Ford Cortina actually taste like? Truth and fiction stir into a potent mix when a godless chef table.

Download: ‘Domestic Godless’ (Extended Cut)

Photos: Jamie Thornton


Sounds:

Living Pages
What You Should Know About Biological Warfare
Cooking Terms and What They Mean
My Little Margie – Episode 14, Series 3 – What’s Cooking

Free Schools or No Schools

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Serious question: Why are we so comfortable with imprisoning children for 12 – 14 years? It seems the answer is we’ve constructed an economic system that requires both parents to work, for most of each weekday. Schools act in loco parentis, helping to tame children in preparation for an adulthood of service to industry. They take in creative, artistic, anarchic individuals and release obedient, ambitious conformists. But there is another way.

BBC News recently ran a great retrospective on the free schools of the 1970’s. Free schools, also known as ‘democratic schools‘ serve a caretaker role, without indoctrinating learned helplessness, conditioning obedience, and training respect for unearned authority. What the article doesn’t mention is that free schools, despite having almost disappeared from the UK, are far from extinct. In the United States Sudbury Valley Schools are an increasingly popular alternative, offering a playground for learning, rather than a cage for ‘education’.

Beyond Sudbury, ‘unskooling‘ (a secular equivalent of ‘home schooling’) is a growing movement in the US, as parents (wealthy enough to have the the choice) remove their children from an increasingly unequal, militarised public school system.

Here’s the thing. We pay lip service to entrepreneurship and ‘life long learning’, but if we really want a society of empowered creative individuals, we can’t expect it to emerge from a cookie cutter approach to ‘training’. People learn, dogs are trained.

A kind of amnesia occurs in parents, who forget just how stifling and uninspiring most of their time spent in school actually was. It’s precisely because the majority of school is spent ‘keeping the head down’, trying to placate capricious teachers, and stressing over exam results, that we remember the teachers who went against the grain and genuinely inspired us.

So what can well intentioned parents and educators actually do? After all, we need an income to survive, and fewer of us than ever have access to the extended alloparenting arrangements that our ancestors enjoyed. The answer isn’t simple or easy – but it’s clear. The twentieth century, 9 – 5 employee / business arrangement doesn’t work. It doesn’t allow us to be citizens invested in our communities. It incentivises employees not to rock the boat, as financial institutions mismanage and outright steal vast quantities of global wealth. It trains us to defer to higher authorities, even when they display no real concern for our best interests.

All these issues are connected: the revolution in robotics that will put most manufacturing and service industry workers out of a job in the next twenty five years. The increasing inequality of the globalised economy, concentrating ever more of our wealth in the hands of a tiny group of literally jet-setting plutocrats. The economic necessity of basic income. The enormous possibilities for learning created by the internet, and the bonkers dropout rate of online courses.

Years ago I volunteered at Seomra Spraoi, a consensus run communal space off Gardener St in Dublin. At the time, Seomra had a parent run Steiner playschool, where a group of volunteer parents put into practice the art driven principles of Waldorf Education. What they shared wasn’t any formal pedagogic education, but a real concern that their children should become rounded human beings.

Here’s the thing – we can all do this. Teaching doesn’t have to be a profession – in fact, I’d argue that (like political office) it should never be. Learning doesn’t have to be something you only do from age four to seventeen or twenty two. Anyone running a business or practicing a profession will tell you that the first couple of years at their job were far more informative than the dozen or more spent in the classroom.

No magic bullet is going to make our education system fit individual kids, rather than the amorphous mass of students. No curriculum (online or off) will erase individual differences, or inspire the way allowing a person to follow their innate interests and talents will. Learning and teaching need to become part of how we operate as people. It might be simple things like creating community education programmes, volunteering at libraries, or teaching as part of our businesses, studios and factories. It might involve working less, taking on less or no debt, and living a more modest life – accepting that we won’t own the latest consumer goods, but will have time to learn to teach and to create, in other words, to live. If we do these things – if we undermine the systems constructed to inhibit us, we’ll empower citizens capable of genuinely changing a system enabled by mediocrity.