The ART of Television – All new comedy drama, coming soon!

Download: ART Trailer

Dead Medium Productions Presents ‘The A.R.T of Television’!

It’s winter 1968, the long hangover after the Summer of Love. A.R.T is Ireland’s finest, and indeed only television station. But the nations flagship soap ‘Home Farm’ is failing as viewers frog march towards the satanic protestant seduction of the BBC. American ad man Claude Chabert is hired to turn the show around. With help from TV chaplain father Terry O’Mahony and feminist firebrand Maureen Masterson can Claude raise the ratings? Or will he fall prey to the machinations of sinister Controller of television Carvel Kiddler? Find out in The A.R.T of Television, a totally made up and completely fictional, not true at all, not even a little bit historical comedy about censorship, stupidity and Irish television. Coming to Phoenix FM and Soundcloud soon!

Dead Medium Productions history

Dead Medium Productions, founded in 2009, is an independent producer of drama and documentary. We have released numerous radio and podcast series. We have produced programmes for Newstalk, RTE Lyric FM, Radiomade, Dublin City FM, and Near FM. Our previous series include ‘Choices’ a surreal comedy about mental health, ‘Any Other Dublin’ a satirical look at the death of the Celtic Tiger, dark cold war drama ‘The Wall in the Mind’, and ‘Mad Scientists of Music’, an award winning documentary about experimental Irish music.

Writer / Director

Gareth Stack is a writer who develops work for radio, theatre and screen. Gareth Stack is a writer, director and pioneering Irish podcaster. In 2005, while senior producer at Trinity FM, he co-created the first Irish internet TV show ‘Technolotics’. Since then he has developed numerous radio documentaries, dramas and podcasts for channels like Newstalk, RTE Lyric FM as well as local and regional radio. Including the award winning series ‘Mad Scientists of Music’, which explored the Irish experimental audio scene. He has worked as arts correspondent for programmes like Culture File & the Dave Fanning show, developed programmes for digital channels like Radiomade, and served as communications officer for the Association of Independent Radio Producers Ireland (AIRPI). Gareth currently teaches courses in Podcasting & ‘Storytelling Through Sound’. Recently he has begun creating work for stage. His last play ‘Mic Drop’, received great reviews at the Scene & Heard festival.

Starring legendary radio actor / producer Roger Gregg!

Roger Gregg is an award winning playwright, composer, audio-producer and actor. Over the past 25 years he has written for Crazy Dog Theatre, Dublin Youth Theatre, TEAM, The American National Audio Theatre Festival, Graffiti Theatre, The Razor Edge, Oberon Theatre and The Gaiety School of Acting. His plays have also been produced by New York University, the University of Missouri, the Theaterpedagogisches Zentrum in Nuremberg, Germany. His Crazy Dog productions have won many international awards including; 3 American Mark Time Science Fiction Awards, 2 Ogle Fantasy Awards and 2 AUDIOFILE Golden Earphone Awards. In 2006 in a special feature reviewing his work, BBC Radio 4 hailed him as ‘one of a handful of truly great radio dramatists’.

Cast

Roger Gregg as Claude Chabert.
Sebastian Connellan = Carvel Kiddler
Seamus Stackpoole = Brendan O’Riordan / Miley O’Cumman
Gareth Stack = Eamon Chabert, Felix (in Sales), A.R.T News Anchor
Tara Cush = Shiela O’Riordan / Maraoid O’Common, Selkie
Niall Bruton = Alan O’Riordan / Ciaran O’Dowd
Thommas Kane Byrne = Fr Terry O’Mahony, Fiacra, Irate Reader
Pamela Flanagan = Maureen Masterson / Lug
Roisin Rankin = Laura O’Mahony, Banshee, BBC Presenter
Aislinn O’Byrne = Saoirse Chabert, Bridget Minerva, Irate Reader

With sound design / recording by Hearsay award winning producer Brendan Rehill (An Klondike, the Wedding Tree).

Thanks, hope you tune in!

BAI CREDIT

Little Black Lies – The Webseries

How can an undead villain search for love in the age of tinder? What if you were socially awkward and a monster? Join one sexy vampire, OK maybe not that sexy, as he tries to find the love of his life, again. This anachronistic horror comedy takes its cues from the eighties feel of recent work like ‘It follows’ and ‘San Junipero’, and springs from the lively Irish comedy scene. The writer and director preciously collaborated on absurd comic shorts like ‘Lads’ and ‘Spaghetti D*ck’, and the series co-stars rising Irish talent like Nicole O’Connor (‘FACTS’), Joe O’Neill (Little Shadow Theatre Company), as well as legendary Irish actor Roger Gregg (‘About Adam’, ‘Space Truckers’).

Little Black Lies Credits

James O’Connor as ‘The Vampire’
Emily Perot as ‘Elvira’
Mike Kunze and Niamh Denyer as ‘Fighting Couple’
Joe O’Neil as ‘Krugel’
Roger Gregg as ‘King of the Vampires’
Dannii Byrne as ‘Dee’
Nicole O’Connor as ‘Fiona’
Derek as himself

Written and directed by Gareth Stack
with additional material by James Van De Waal

Director of Photography, Orla McNelis
Sound, James Van De Waal and Patrick O’Brien
Assistant Director, Special Effects and Makeup, Frances Galligan
Editer, Spider Baby

Music – Josh Lis & Seb Dooris
Theme – Patrick Carolan

Extras

Emer Hedderman
Niamh Donnelly
Patrick Carolan
Eimear ‘Ninja’ Clarkin
Oisin Gartlan
Gemma Glynn
James Van De Waal
Conor Duffy
Kejt Stachura
Patrick O’Brien
Kim Manning
Amy O’Connell
Sebastian Dooris
Conn Cowman
Glenn Kaufmann
Dorota Skiba
Nathan Butterly

Special Thanks to

A4 Sounds
12 Henrietta St
Oisin Gartlan
Romayo’s Diner
The Glimmerman
The Wonderful Barn

Sound Effects

http://freesound.org/people/SteveMannella/sounds/86167/
http://freesound.org/people/reznik_Krkovicka/sounds/240895/
http://freesound.org/people/thegoose09/sounds/125393/
http://freesound.org/people/spoonbender/sounds/244942/
http://freesound.org/people/newagesoup/sounds/339361/
http://freesound.org/people/juskiddink/sounds/66346/
http://freesound.org/people/Zabuhailo/sounds/148140/
http://freesound.org/people/mefrancis13/sounds/117608/
http://freesound.org/people/badvibezproductionz/sounds/178370/
http://freesound.org/people/limetoe/sounds/257757/
http://freesound.org/people/CadereSounds/sounds/222527/
http://freesound.org/people/Erdie/sounds/65734/
http://freesound.org/people/LeMudCrab/sounds/163453/
http://freesound.org/people/urupin/sounds/178813/
http://freesound.org/people/JakLocke/sounds/261295/
http://freesound.org/people/digifishmusic/sounds/76058/
http://freesound.org/people/digifishmusic/sounds/76064/
http://freesound.org/people/jobro/sounds/46220/
http://freesound.org/people/potentjello/sounds/194081/
http://freesound.org/people/Kodack/sounds/256310/
http://freesound.org/people/JoelAudio/sounds/135463/
http://freesound.org/people/dauser/sounds/254975/
http://freesound.org/people/newagesoup/sounds/335956/
http://freesound.org/people/bareform/sounds/237558/

Aping Tiffin

Credits

Cast – James O’Connor, Pamela Flanagan, Gavan O’Connor Duffy, Niall Bruton, Alicky Hess

Director – Gareth Stack
Script – Gareth Stack, James Van De Waal, and James O’Connor
Rehearsal Director – James O’Connor
Music – Josh Lis
Vision mixer – Sean Drew
Producer – Kara Kelly
Graphics – Keith McEvoy
Ingest – Amy O’Brien
Autocue – Sinead O Hanlon
PA – Angela English
Vision engineer – Claire Prenty
Sound 1 desk – Andrea Farrell
Sound 2 floor – Brian O Neill
Camera 1 – Darren Moynagh
Camera 2 – Orla Carney
Camera 3 – Aisling Leonard
Camera 4 – Lauren Rol
Camera 5 – Stephen Daly
Lighting – Simon Jeffers
Runner/Hospitality – John Kelly
Floor manager – Brian Hyland
Makeup – Alyx Gonzalez

The Impact of the Net

This is an assignment written as part of my recent masters in Broadcast Production. It was interesting to take an overview of online media, a decade after regularly writing about its impacts. In a sense surprisingly little has changed… Remix culture is still alive, and still illegal. Podcasts and online video are more popular than ever, but have done little to replace established media. Blogs have ceased to matter, despite the efforts of medium and aggregators, and more surprisingly despite their utility and disseminators of free specialist knowledge. There exists in the public conversation only the polarised ‘mainstream media’ and the ephemeral and even more polarised tweet. The level of online discourse has hence inarguably diminished; a further impact of the ‘Eternal September’ ongoing since the weeds of the net outgrew the ivy league. Overall though, the online world of 2017 looks remarkably similar to the world of a decade past.

Title: An optimistic view of the impact of the internet is that it is a democratic and life-enhancing force for culture and communication. The main criticisms of that hopeful approach are that the internet has enabled unequal access, centralization of power and new forms of power through surveillance. (Hesmondhalgh, David. The Cultural Industries (3rded). Ch9 Sage 2013) Analyse these contrasting arguments with reference to broadcasting.

Introduction

Today’s English language internet is dominated by a single search engine (Google), two social networks (Facebook and Twitter), and a few hundred smartphone applications (Alexia.com, 2017) (Perry, 2016). Yet it is also paradoxically stocked by ‘user created content’ – the podcasts, comments, blog posts, images and videos created by the nets 3.5 billion users (ITU, 2016). Today’s ‘network of networks’ is in a sense the final medium, a canvas for all current and future communications technologies, from mobile phone calls to virtual reality. But it exists in a state of tension. Since its inception the internet has struggled with competing imperatives – openness vs privacy, free speech vs censorship, commercialisation vs open source, privacy vs the panopticon. The internet frees us to communicate instantaneously across the globe, even as it makes the monitoring and permanent storage of that communication trivial. It lets us publish our ideas and creative work, even as it makes them so ubiquitous, easily mimicked and duplicated as to be valueless. It’s the source of limitless education and constant manipulation. This essay will examine how this most contradictory of mediums has impacted broadcasters and audiences alike.

The Evolution of the Net

The internet was born at the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) of the US defence department. Work at APRA and the RAND think tank in the 1960’s and early 70’s laid the groundwork for a single grand computer network, interconnecting all others. The network was based on the decentralised structure of the human brain, an interconnected system with no single point of failure (Ryan, 2010). Beginning in 1973 the net spread from exclusive military use to the research community (Ziewitz, 2011). Through enthusiasts and later commercial internet service providers, the net opened to home users beginning in the late 1970’s (Ryan, 2010). The advent of the world wide web, developed at CERN in 1991, popularised the domestic and commercial uses of the net (Berners-Lee & Fischetti, 2000). However, the modern internet, composed of mobile apps, the web, chat services, cloud storage and processing, file-sharing, the ‘always on’ elements of computer operating systems and the emerging ‘internet of things’, still relies on the core infrastructure developed at ARPA (Khodkari & Maghrebi, 2016).

As bulletin board systems, gopher internet relay chat, and latterly the web spread, they competed with private subscription services offering curated programmatic content. Services like Compuserve and America Online did not initially include access to the open internet, despite relying on its underlying TCP/IP technology (Ryan, 2010). Like today’s social networks they were ‘walled gardens’, private spaces where content modelled on network television was curated, managed and sanitised (Bruns & Burgess, 2015). In stark contrast, the ‘user generated’ wilds of the early internet contained any number of thorns, from pirated media and illegal pornography, to guides to the manufacture and use of weapons (Deibert, 2010).

Ultimately the internet’s greater variety of content and wider pool of users outcompeted the private online services. But this dynamic conflict between the open free transfer of information and corporate networks that offer polished services at the expense of user control, continues to this day (Noam et al, 2003). Today’s internet user primarily consumes and produces content through closed source applications purchased from curated stores owned and operated by powerful corporations (Adams et al, 2012).

The utopian vision of an internet free from censorship and corporate control was articulated in an influential statement ‘A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace’ by Electronic Freedom Foundation (EFF) founder John Perry Bardow. Bardow and technologists and hackers like him stood for the vision of an internet free from “legal concepts of property, expression, identity, movement”. They sought to “create a civilization of the Mind in Cyberspace…. more humane and fair than the world your governments have made before” (EFF, 1996). Put another way, ‘information wants to be free’ (Clarke, 2016).

“Information Wants To Be Free. Information also wants to be expensive. Information wants to be free because it has become so cheap to distribute, copy, and recombine—too cheap to meter. It wants to be expensive because it can be immeasurably valuable to the recipient. That tension will not go away. It leads to endless wrenching debate about price, copyright, ‘intellectual property’, the moral rightness of casual distribution, because each round of new devices makes the tension worse, not better.”

Stewart Brand, ‘The Media Lab, Inventing the Future at MIT’, 1987

As broadcasters encountered the internet they found in it both a place to promote their content, and an existential risk (Lee & Lee, 2015). The net offered access to a global audience, yet it made the mechanisms of broadcast television all but obsolete. Despite the crude low resolution imagery of early internet video, and the slow speeds of early file transfer programmes over dialup internet, by the late 1990’s it was already apparent that all programming would ultimately be available in some form online (Dowling et al, 1998).

 

All Consuming Platforms

This came to pass first through the free sharing enabled by peer-to-peer platforms like BitTorrent, and later via corporate stores and streaming platforms. Today all major broadcasters and production companies offer their programming for sale or rental online. Surprisingly, broadcast television has not disappeared in the wake of ubiquitous online access and cheap ‘prosumer’ content creation technology. Instead broadcasters have adapted in a wide variety of ways to the inescapable reality of the internet. Streaming TV services both net native (Netflix, Amazon), and ‘old media’ owned (Hulu, BBC iPlayer, RTE Player, HBO Go etc) provide always on access to archives of previously broadcast progammes. Enabling viewers to ‘binge watch’ entire series in a short period (Matrix, 2014). Increasingly these services commission new programming for an online only audience (Carr & Somaiya, 2014). The pressure these platforms (and other forms of ad skipping) have put on traditional advertising has massively increased product placement (Schweidel et al, 2014). Meanwhile broadcast television has balkanized: Bifurcating into a small number of premium channels developing high end scripted productions, and a much larger number of channels producing low budget, often exploitative, reality programming (Serpe, 2013). The turnover of new programming formats is enormously higher than before, creating a multi-billion euro format market for programmes that can be customized and resold in multiple territories (Moran, 2013).

Podcasting, a new medium for the distribution of audio content developed in the early 2000s, initially empowered independent creators to cheaply release spoken word programming. However, as with video, centralised ownership and the ‘discoverability problem’ have led to podcasts charts becoming dominated by traditional broadcasters and new media companies founded by former traditional broadcasters (Bottomley, 2015). In recent weeks facebook have announced the launch of ‘live audio’, an integrated platform for audio streaming, which threatens to take a wall off a significant segment of the field dominated by podcasting (Facebook, 2016). A similar path was followed by blogging which initially promised to give air to a diversity of perspectives. Over time aggregator sites like Reddit, blog-like news organisations such as Gawker and Buzzfeed, and centralised platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Medium leveraged network effects to overwhelm independent sites (Arthur, 2009). While blogs and non-commercial media outlets like Indiemedia still exist, their significance has greatly decreased. Today, the primary outlets for ‘user created content’ are platforms like twitter, facebook and youtube (Brake, 2004). These sites limit what can be posted, disseminated and ‘monitized’; practicing de facto censorship in response to commercial and political imperatives (Heins, 2013). Often prohibiting anonymous or pseudonymous posting (van der Nagel & Frith, 2015). While intended to reduce online abuse, this can endanger writers and creators working in authoritarian regimes (Grönlund & Wakabi, 2015), or in vulnerable domestic circumstances.

The recommendation and filtering engines that keep users returning to these sites have resulted in the creation of ‘filter bubbles’: Wells of inoffensive agreeable opinion, leading to the polarisation of political perspectives and the mistaken impression of uniformity (Bakshy et al, 2015). This trend has culminated in the creation and dissemination of ‘fake news’, wilfully misleading articles with provocative titles that are widely shared within partisan political bubbles (Khaldarova & Pantti, 2016). Allegations persist that such articles – in addition to state sponsored ‘astroturfing’ (fake grassroots campaigning) had a role in influencing the 2016 US elections (Bessi & Ferrara, 2016).

By centralising distribution and identity, the new media sites also enable profoundly invasive surveillance. The widely publicised leaks of Edward Snowdon and Chelsey Manning revealed ubiquitous surveillance of online communication and social media sites (Stoycheff, 2016). Blanket online surveillance is carried out internationally by American intelligence agencies like the NSA, and in the UK and Ireland by British military intelligence GCHQ. As far back as the late eighteenth century Jeremy Bentham predicted the chilling effect constant imperceptible surveillance would have on the surveilled (Sheridan & Foucault, 1977). Experiments by Facebook in manipulating user emotion through subtle variations in the content of their ‘news feed’, point to the additional dangers of affect manipulation (Grimmelmann, 2014).

Worryingly, the analysis of so called ‘big data’ the aggregated and commodified behaviour of citizens online and off, produces only correlations. To employ these correlations predictively requires experimental hypothesis testing (Zuboff, 2015). This creates an enormous incentive for the manipulation of mass audiences online. Zuboff, 2015, refers to the large media platforms as ‘surveillance capitalists’, commodifying the behaviour of their users in ever more invasive and manipulative ways. The authoritarian regime in China has already developed a social network that penalises antisocial behaviour via a ‘social credit score’ (SATPRC, 2014). This formalises the rankings provided by ‘subscriptions’ and ‘likes’, that already accrue to inoffensive and extreme opinions alike across social networks. Chinese officials have stated that this “new system will reward those who report acts of breach of trust” (BBC News, 2015).

 

Illegal Art

With the advent of file sharing and the online hosting of media, internet users formed a new adversarial relationship with ‘big content’. As the early file trading networks like Gnutella and Napster grew, so did the fear that the unmetered sharing of information would undercut corporate profits. New laws were rapidly drafted which penalised and even criminalised file sharing and thousands – including many college students, found themselves sued for large sums. Non-commercial infringement was no defence against laws like the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. Librarians and lecturers could be prosecuted for making ‘infringing copies’ of scholarly texts or articles (Clark, D, 2002).

While these laws had a negligible effect on the popularity of filesharing (and filesharing in turn has had a negligible effect on music sales), they had a distinct impact on the evolutionary direction of the internet (Oberholzer & Strumpf, 2007) (Oberholzer & Strumpf, 2016). The new intellectual property regime meant that broadcasters and programme makers had for the first time control over the kinds of devices and services that could distribute their content. In the 1980’s broadcasters lost the battle to prevent home taping (Madrigal, 2012), creating a new video rental market which ultimately spurred the creation of DVD and Blu-ray. Now however, unapproved use and sale could be legally sanctioned. Where the unsanctioned re-edit and recording of soul & disco gave birth to hip hop, now such innovation was impractical. While various forms of ‘illegal art’ have emerged since the advent of the new international copyright regime – from mashup videos to vaporwave – we’ve also seen the prohibition of work of immense popularity. In 2004, the American artist Danger Mouse produced a critically acclaimed record combining elements of the Beatles White Album with JZ’s Black Album. The Grey album became enormously popular but was rapidly removed from online distribution by the corporations who owned copyrights to both original recordings (Gunderson, 2004). Where two decades before sampling had provided the backbone of a nascent hiphop scene, now one of the most popular and innovative artists in a generation had been censored in the name of profit (McLeod, 2004). Latterly, an uneasy compromise has been arrived at, with record companies largely tolerating the non-commercial release of ‘mixtapes’ – albums containing ‘uncleared’ samples, as hype building exercises that develop anticipation for tours and official releases (Anderson, 2008). However, in the realm of video such tolerance has not come to pass, with ‘DCMA takedown requests’ frequently employed to remove not only ‘infringing’ art, but also political statements, critical product reviews, and other material likely to threaten corporate profits (Loren, 2011). While the modern IP regime originated in the US, the last three decades have seen a concerted effort at ‘copyright harmonisaton’: The export of American intellectual property and trademark law (often accompanied by more severe criminal penalties) internationally (Sell, 2003) (Baker, 2004).

Conclusion

The internet’s impact on culture and communications has been complex, nuanced and multifarious. Inarguably the net has made possible a level of surveillance and manipulation previously undreamt of. The roles of broadcaster and content producer have merged, as countless new distribution opportunities developed and became subsumed by the social networks. Broadcasters and programme makers can today find global audiences more readily and cheaply than ever before. Native speakers can subscribe to programming and channels in their own languages almost anywhere on earth. Minority interest programming can be created exclusively for new platforms without recourse to traditional gatekeepers. At the same time, programme makers must contend with abusive copyright regimes (and conversely piracy), overwhelming competition, less captive audiences and declining advertising revenue. The big winners in this new landscape have been intellectually undemanding entertainment formats, appealing to mass audiences and easily customised to local markets.
Perhaps the greatest threats to critically engaged broadcasting arise from state and corporate censorship. Today censorship can arise algorithmically, from well intentioned efforts to increase user engagement, and with it profits. It can enable the worst elements of authoritarian state surveillance and intervention: The observation and manipulation of the intimate communications of everyday people. Under East Germany’s notorious Stazi regime, the practice of Zersetzung was employed against dissidents (Dennis, 2006). This was the willful distortion of a person’s experience of the world. The secret destruction of their personal and professional relationships. Zersetzung was a form of state gaslighting that isolated and psychologically injured its victims. Today’s online media landscape has the potential to be just as damaging. Internet users, cut off from one another in self referencing echo chambers, can become radically disconnected. These bubbles threaten the very possibility of a shared political and cultural landscape: And with the the stability of society, family and social relationships.

The net has accelerated financial inequality, even as it has led to unparalleled economic growth and access to information. We live in a Golden Age of Television (Thompson, 2013), with the most inventive, high quality drama ever broadcast. And yet enormous audiences prefer to watch and share the most trivial short form videos: Distractions that represent the least informative and edifying forms of escapism. We can publicise our interests and find others who share them. Yet keeping our viewing preferences, our online behavior and our communications private is all but impossible.

The impact of the internet has no valance. It has not been to influence mass communication, but rather to replace it. It has not merely affected existing media, but rather engulfed it. Broadcasting and narrowcasting are classifications of a bygone age. Media and communication are now united in a spectacular, universal panopticon. A place where any may speak, but where it is increasingly difficult to truly listen.

 

References

Adams, C., Thorne, M., Fuzz, M. Hyde, M., Perez Nuñez, A., Phillips, J., Safadi, B., Erkalovic, A., Threw, B. (2012). The Open Web. Christopher Adams.

Alexa.com. (2017). Alexa Top 500 Global Sites. [online] Available at: http://www.alexa.com/topsites [Accessed 2 Jan. 2017].

Anderson, H. (2008) ‘Criminal Minded?’ Mixtape DJs, the Piracy Paradox, and Lessons for the Recording Industry. Tennessee Law Review, Vol. 76 No. 1, 2008.

Arthur, C. (2009). The long tail of blogging is dying. [online] the Guardian. Available at: https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2009/jun/24/charles-arthur-blogging-twitter [Accessed 3 Jan. 2017].

Barker, J. (2004). Grossly excessive penalties in the battle against illegal file-sharing: The troubling effects of aggregating minimum statutory damages for copyright infringement. Tex L. Rev., 83, p.525.

Bakshy, E., Messing, S. and Adamic, L.A. (2015). Exposure to ideologically diverse news and opinion on Facebook. Science, 348(6239), pp.1130-1132.

BBC News. (2015). China ‘social credit’: Beijing sets up huge system – BBC News. [online] Available at: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-34592186 [Accessed 2 Jan. 2017].

Berners-Lee, T. and Fischetti, M. (2000). Weaving the Web: The Original Design and Ultimate Destiny of the World Wide Web by Its Inventor. HarperInformation, [online] p. Available at: http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=556560 [Accessed 19 Nov. 2016].

Bessi, A., Ferrara, E. (2016). Social Bots Distort the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election Online Discussion. First Monday, Vol 21, 11-7.

Bottomley, A.J. (2015). Podcasting: A decade in the life of a “New” audio medium: Introduction. Journal of Radio & Audio Media, 22(2), pp.164-169.

Brake, D.R. (2014). Are we all online content creators now? Web 2.0 and digital divides. Journal of Computer‐Mediated Communication, 19(3), pp.591-609.

Brand, S. (1987). The Media Lab. 1st ed. New York, N.Y.: Viking.

Bruns, A., Burgess, J. (2015). A Companion to New Media Dynamics. John Wiley & Sons.

Carr, D. and Somaiya, R. (2014). Punching Above Its Weight, Upstart Netflix Pokes at HBO. New York Times, 16.

Clark, D. (2002) How Copyright Became Controversial. In: Copy Fights: The Future of Intellectual Property in the Information Age. Ed. Thierer, A. Cato Institute.

Clark, R. (2016). Roger Clarke’s ‘Information Wants to be Free …’. [online] Available at: http://www.rogerclarke.com/II/IWtbF.html [Accessed 19 Nov. 2016].

Deibert, R. (2010). Access Controlled: The Shaping of Power, Rights, and Rule in Cyberspace. MIT Press.

Dennis, M. (2006). Surviving the Stasi: Jehovah’s Witnesses in Communist East Germany, 1965 to 1989. In: Religion, State and Society. Band 34, Nummer 2, , S. 145-168

Dowling, M., Lechner, C. and Thielmann, B. (1998). Convergence–Innovation and change of market structures between television and online services. Electronic Markets, 8(4), pp.31-35.

Electronic Frontier Foundation. (2016). A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace. [online] Available at: https://www.eff.org/cyberspace-independence [Accessed 19 Nov. 2016].

Facebook. (2016). Introducing Live Audio | Facebook Media. [online] Available at: https://media.fb.com/2016/12/20/introducing-live-audio/ [Accessed 3 Jan. 2017].

Grimmelmann, J. (2014). The Facebook emotional manipulation study: Sources. The Laboratorium.

Grönlund, Å., Wairagala W. (2015). “Citizens’ Use of New Media in Authoritarian Regimes: A Case Study of Uganda.” The Electronic Journal of Information Systems in Developing Countries 67.

Gunderson, P. (2004). Danger Mouse’s Grey Album, Mash-Ups, and the Age of Composition. Postmodern Culture, 15(1).

Heins, M. (2013). Brave New World of Social Media Censorship, The. Harv. L. Rev. F., 127, p.325.
ITU. (2016) ICT Facts and Figures 2016. [online] Available at: http://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/Statistics/Pages/facts/default.aspx [Accessed 3 Jan. 2017].

Khaldarova, I., Pantti, M. (2016). Fake News: The narrative battle over the Ukrainian conflict. Journalism Practice, pp.1-11.

Khodkari, H., Maghrebi, S.G. (2016) Necessity of the integration Internet of Things and cloud services with quality of service assurance approach. Bulletin de la Société Royale des Sciences de Liège, Vol. 85, 2016, p. 434 – 445 434.

Lee, S.Y. and Lee, S.W. (2015). Online video services and other media: Substitutes or complement. Computers in Human Behavior, 51, pp.293-299.

Leiner, B., Cerf, V., Clark, D., Kahn, R., Kleinrock, L., Lynch, D., Postel, J., Roberts, L. and Wolff, S. (1997). The past and future history of the Internet. Communications of the ACM, 40(2), pp.102-108.

Loren, L, P. (2011) Deterring Abuse of the Copyright Takedown Regime by Taking Misrepresentation Claims Seriously. Wake Forest Law Review. Vol 745.

Madrigal, A. (2012). The Court Case That Almost Made It Illegal to Tape TV Shows. [online] The Atlantic. Available at: http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2012/01/the-court-case-that-almost-made-it-illegal-to-tape-tv-shows/251107/ [Accessed 3 Jan. 2017].

Matrix, S. (2014). The Netflix effect: Teens, binge watching, and on-demand digital media trends. Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures, 6(1), pp.119-138.

McLeod, K. (2004). How Copyright Law Changed Hip Hop. [online] Available at: http://www.alternet.org/story/18830/how_copyright_law_changed_hip_hop [Accessed 3 Jan. 2017].

Moran, A. (2013). Global Television Formats: Genesis and Growth. Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 8, Number 2, July 2013, pp. 1-19(19)

Noam, E., Hay, D., Baye, M., Morgan, J. (2003). The Internet: Still Wide Open and Competitive?. SSRN Electronic Journal.

Oberholzer‐Gee, F. and Strumpf, K. (2007). The effect of file sharing on record sales: An empirical analysis. Journal of political economy, 115(1), pp.1-42.

Oberholzer-Gee, F. and Strumpf, K. (2016). The effect of file sharing on record sales, revisited. Information Economics and Policy, 37, pp.61-66.

Perry, C. (2016). The Shape of the App Store. [online] Available at: http://dazeend.org/2015/01/the-shape-of-the-app-store/ [Accessed 2 Jan. 2017].

Ryan, J. (2010). A History of the Internet and the Digital Future, Reaktion Books, London, GB., pp 1 – 20.
Salus, V. (1995). Casting the Net: From ARPANET to Internet and Beyond… Addison-Wesley Longman Publishing Co., Inc., [online] p. Available at: http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=545810 [Accessed 19 Nov. 2016].

Schweidel, D.A., Foutz, N.Z., Tanner, R. J. (2014). Synergy or interference: the effect of product placement on commercial break audience decline. Marketing Science, 33(6), pp.763-780.

Sell, S.K. (2003). Private power, public law: the globalization of intellectual property rights (Vol. 88). Cambridge University Press.

Serpe, N. (2013). Reality Pawns: The New Money TV. Dissent, 60(3), pp.13-18.

Sheridan, A., Foucault, M. (1977). Discipline and Punish (pp. 1-30). New York: Pantheon.

State Administration of Taxation of the Peoples Republic of China (2014). State Administration Of Taxation. [online] Available at: http://www.chinatax.gov.cn/2013/n2925/n2957/c778860/content.html [Accessed 3 Jan. 2017].

Stoycheff, E. (2016). Under Surveillance Examining Facebook’s Spiral of Silence Effects in the Wake of NSA Internet Monitoring. Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, 93(2), pp.296-311.

Thompson, D. (2013). Netflix,‚House of Cards ‘and the Golden Age of Television. The Atlantic, 7.
van der Nagel, Emily, and Jordan Frith. (2015). Anonymity, pseudonymity, and the agency of online identity: Examining the social practices of r/Gonewild. First Monday 20, no. 3.

Ziewitz, M., Brown, I. (2011). A Prehistory of Internet Governance. Research Handbook on Governance of the Internet, Ian

Brown, ed., Edward Elgar Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd. London.

Zuboff, S. (2015). Article analysis – Big other: surveillance capitalism and the prospects of an information civilization. Journal of Information Technology. 30, 75–89.

Migrant Fictions

MigraFi_illustration_color

Download: Migrant Fictions (54 Megs)

Migrant Fictions is an ambitious new drama project, bringing together the talents of a diverse group of immigrant writers to capture their experience as émigrés to Ireland. German-Polish writer / director Dominik Turkowski developed five short drama scripts through workshops with writers from the immigrant community. Their stories capture the varied experiences of newcomers to Ireland. This project provided the opportunity for immigrants to articulate their experiences in their own words, through five short radio dramas. These dramas were devised collectively by the migrants themselves, and connect in profound and mysterious ways that reflect with humour and humanity what it means to be a migrant in Ireland today.

We’d like to thank world famous film and videogame composer Craig Stuart Garfinkle who kindly donated his compositions to the project.

The Writers

The plays were written by a talented and diverse group of Migrant Writers. The writers were Dalia Smelstoriūtė, Özgecan Kesici, Dominik Turkowski, Tina Brescanu, and Chandrika Narayanan-Mohan.

Producer and sound designer was Gareth Stack.

Check out the shows complete Credits.

The Plays

Experience 5 ten-minute dramas on travel, isolation and the tension between tradition and modern lifestyles. 5 stories sharing perspectives on  love and family, of acceptance and prejudice, of frustration with the bureaucracy and profound questions between home and adoptive culture.

In profound and mysterious ways they reflect with humour and humanity what it means to be a migrant in Ireland today.

Girl On A Plane

Elif, a German born Kazakh girl, is travelling home to meet her father. Elif is studying biochemistry in Ireland, but has dreams of becoming an actress. Dreams her traditionalist father thinks are beneath his daughter. Will she go her own way ?

Howling Walls

Robert has inherited a valuable collection of paintings – the work of his well-known >artist mother Margaret Owalska, a Polish migrant to Ireland. At an auction shortly after his mother’s death, Robert is interrupted by a man who is claiming ownership of his mother’s work.

Talk at Me 

Aysegul, a Turkish migrant working in Dublin, meets her boyfriend for coffee. Really Aseygul wants to address her VISA worries, but she has to deal with the reality that her boyfriend is more interested in expressing his own opinions than listening to her problems. Asysegul has been rejected by the bureaucracy of the employment permit programme. Will she have to return to the unstable political situation in Turkey ?

Eat In or Take Out 

Egle, an elderly Lithuanian woman travelling in Ireland for work, heads to a restaurant to meet Jonas. Jonas is in Ireland working eighty hour weeks to save up money for his wife and child back home. Together they talk about life and while a new friendship unfolds, Egle is also facing the sudden ending of a long lasting romance.

I Belong – Tina Brescanu

A young Swedish girl Pernilla, falls for Carrick, a charming Irish musician on a hot night in a Swedish town. Following him back to Ireland, Pernilla must deal with the realities of working in Ireland, crank callers, and a rude elderly lady she cares for, Peig. Gradually Pernilla and Peig develop a mutual respect and become fast friends. At the same time, pressured by Carrick to join him living in isolated Connemara, Pernilla is pushed to take a tough decision..

BAI CREDIT

Dead Medium Productions to create two new Sound & Vision funded Programmes

Dead Medium Productions are proud to announce that we’ve been granted funding for two new programmes in the latest round of the BAI’s ‘Sound & Vision Scheme’. These are ‘The A.R.T of Television’ for Dublin South FM, and ‘The Free School’ for Newstalk. This follows BAI’s funding of three programmes in December 2016, bringing the total number of Sound & Vision supported programmes developed by Dead Medium to twelve since 2013.

The Art of Television is a satirical screwball comedy starring Roger Gregg, set in the early days of Irish television broadcasting.  A time when government and church fought young broadcasters struggling to innovate on the nation’s fledgling TV channel. American writer Claude Chabert lands a job early Irish soap opera ’Home Farm’. Claude finds himself trapped between the political pressures and on the rigid censorship of late 1960’s Ireland. Attempting to kill the show, he resorts to improbable storylines rooted in Irish mythology, creating an unexpected hit. Now Claude must balance the demands of crafty civil servants, a meddling church and an unruly cast.

The Free School is a documentary exploring a revolutionary new school, and it’s impact on Irish education. A revolutionary new school opened recently in Ireland. Wicklow Sudbury school challenges every assumption we hold about education. This is a school with no teachers, no timetables, no exams and no classes. A school where children as young as seven and as old as eighteen work together. A place where young people are free to do whatever they want, whenever they want. The Sudbury model represents a challenge to and an opportunity for our school system. This radical form of schooling has been running in the United States for almost fifty years, but can it work here? This documentary follows the first few months of the fledgling school. Listeners will meet students, staff and parents, and explore what they found lacking in conventional education. In the process we’ll see just what Irish education can learn from The Free School.

The Bee Loud Cabaret comes to Lyric FM

The first episode of ‘The Bee Loud Glade Cabaret‘, a new poetry programme created by Roger Gregg and executive produced by Dead Medium Productions just aired on RTE Lyric’s Nova. You can hear the show for the next five weeks on Nova (Sunday’s at 8PM), then for the following seven weeks on Evelyn Grant’s Weekend Drive (Saturdays at 4PM).

The Bee Loud Glade Cabaret is a series of twelve bite-size programmes bringing the best of the contemporary Irish spoken word scene to radio. Each episode showcases one beautifully produced spoken word performance, and one ‘backstage’ interview with emerging & established Irish poets. The series represents an exciting new approach to poetry on radio, mixing studio performance, music and soundscapes to recreate the excitement of the live poetry scene.

Featured poets include Gerry Murphy, Grace Wells, Pat Boran, Mary O’Donoghue, John Moynes, Leland Bardwell, Caelainn Bradley, Stephen Clare, Genevieve Healy, Patrick Chapman, and Eleanor Hooker.

Performers include Ethan Dillon, Deirdre Molloy, James O’Connor,  Angel Hannigan, John Moynes, Amilia Clarke Stewart, Juliette Crosbie, Suzie Seweify, and Olivia Haran.

Special thanks to Eoin O’Kelly at Lyric for commissioning the series.

Funded by the Broadcasting Authority of Ireland, with the television licence fee.

BAI CREDIT

Three Great Reviews for Mic Drop

dsc_6327

My second play ‘Mic Drop’ just finished it’s workshop run at the Scene + Heard Festival in Smock Alley. We received a couple of positive reviews.

“It is uncomfortable and disturbing, well-judged in the writing and carried off to perfection by the actor.  This is a talented writer and a fine young actor; their future work will be worth watching.”

No More Workhorse

“The script is finger-licking for any actor, and in the words of Pardo, Tyrell takes it and eats it with his f(ck)ng mouth. It’s perhaps the most intense one-man performance I’ve seen since Jonathan Capdevielle’s role as a serial killer (and his victims) in Gisele Vienne’s production of Dennis Cooper’s Jerk. Tyrell struts and frets his half hour on the stage like his life depends on it (no doubt Pardo believes that it does). Modafinilled out of his box, Pardo is itching for confrontation but has to content himself with feeding off the nervous quiet of the audience.”

Andrew P Allen 

“As it stands Mic Drop is a fun and momentarily brutal 30 minutes of performance that is immersive and engaging. Its present format mirrors the story almost too well and, like Perry, there are a few cracks in the overall piece. Mic Drop has a lot of potential to be developed into something greater and this taster demonstrates Tyrrell’s capability and Stack’s writing talent. It shines a satirical spotlight on the modern interpretation of ‘success’ while acknowledging society’s role in its own demise. Perry, like a lot of monsters, is man-made.”

David Keane

Perry Pardo is coming to Dublin!

Perry Pardo, one of the worlds most charismatic and influential business speakers is arriving in Dublin. RTE Business show ‘Time for Business’ caught up with him last week. I helped out with the shoot. Interesting guy. You can book tickets to hear him speak here. Perry is also on Twitter.

Mic Drop in the Scene & Heard Festival – Tickets available now!

micdrop2-small

Dear Friends, I hold in my hands the booklet for the ‘Scene & Heard’ festival 2017. Featuring my newest play ‘Mic Drop‘. I cannot explain what a huge deal it is for me to be featured alongside the incredibly talented people putting together shows for this festival. This is only my second play, and I already feel like I’m in love with writing for theatre, the horrible sweaty tension of watching the audience watch your play, the unpaid hours, the hair loss. Wait no, maybe its awful. But anyway the play is really good, and Adam Tyrell is brilliant in it, and it’s only 12 euro (10 euro concessions) so you should all see it. Otherwise the MAIN FUCKING SPACE in SMOCK FUCKING ALLEY will look hella empty. Please come, I love you. February 24th, 25th and 26th.

Tickets here! – https://smockalley.ticketsolve.com/#/shows/873569415

dsc_0053

Perry Pardo is an entrepreneur – wealthy, successful, envied. Perry came from the streets, like Dre. Join him as he shows you how to succeed. How to get what you want. How to crush your opposition. How to scream for help.

Written & Directed by Gareth Stack.
Starring Adam Tyrell.
Produced by Joe O’Neill / Little Shadow Theatre Company.